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English 102 Final prep


Final: 1017: Monday 5/9 1 to 3 CBC C116

1023: Wednesday 5/11 3:10 to 5:10 in CBC C113

 

This is worth 10 percent of your grade

 

Part I – identify and write the following elements from the column:

1.     The rhetorical situation

Writer:

Audience:

Topic:

Occasion:

Purpose:

 

2.      Intro – what type of intro

3.     The Thesis --  

4.     The topics (essay map)

 

Part II – pretend you are using this as a source for a research paper

1.     Write a one-paragraph annotation for a bibliography

Summary, response, evaluation

Brooks writes that it’s almost impossible to anticipate future threats and understand the people who cause them. Bin Laden’s history didn’t necessarily show that he would grow into an international terrorist. Brooks descriptions are true. No matter what signs are in a person’s history, it’s difficult to explain what drives them to evil. Brooks is a credible source because he is a well known columnist who has written a lot about Bin Laden. He uses two major sources, so I can tell he did research.

2.     Demonstrate your proficiency with 1. Quoting 2. Paraphrasing 3. Summarizing

“He banned Sesame Street, Tabasco sauce and straws from his home,” Brooks writes. “He covered his eyes if an unveiled woman entered the room. He liked to watch the news, but he had his children stand by the set and turn down the volume whenever music came on” (Brooks par. 8).

As Coll stressed in his interview on Monday, Bin Laden’s radical nature while not everybody’s cup of tea, was normal in his society and he was not a rebel as a young man (Brooks par. 9).

Bin Laden wasn’t a fighter, he instead organized young fighters for jihad. After surviving a Soviet attack, he started to build a self-glorifying image.

 

3.     Analysis and evaluate

Quotation analysis:

Paraphrase evaluation:

4.     “Show the other side”

Using techniques of refuting, conceding or accommodating, write a 1 paragraph rebuttal to Brooks:

Refute – why it’s wrong

Concede – acknowledge its legitimacy, part or whole

Accommodate – explain how can be reconciled to your own, compatible

 

Part III – argument essay intro graf

 

Part IV -- argument essay timed

 


Peer group review questions

Please hand in these questions completed (on the worksheet I gave you on the back of the WP4 assignment sheet) or on loose paper by the end of class for credit. I will return them to you on Wednesday, so you should take note of any vital information given to you by your peers before turning it in to me.

Rough Draft Review: Project III

 

 

1.      Is each entry summarized completely (do you get a sense of what the original article is about/proves)? Give an example.

 

2.      Did the evaluations of each source make sense/have something to back up the assessments?

 

3.      How could these sources strengthen his/her argument? Inform his/her argument? Give an example.

 

4.      Was MLA format correctly employed? If not, where?


5.      Are his/her sources reliable? Pass the CRAAP test?


WP 3 due Wednesday. Don't leave it until the night before.

March 23 class notes


Freewriting topic:
What sources have you found so far for your paper? What are some other places you could look to find sources?
5 minutes
1. Scholarly source: Acaemic Search Premier UNLV library "Digital Media"
2. Internet, generally the more specific you get the better:
foreign policy articles, publications
government websites
books (with one or more authors)
book with an editor
volume work
work in a series
published proceedings of a conference, lecture (harvard.edu)
tedtalks.com (sociology topics)
anthology
articles (daily monthly)
reviews
editorials
websites
article in a newspaper (web)
magazine (web)
government pub (web)
image
TV or radio program (NPR.org)
video recording
sound recording
podcast
blog
a wiki
journals on the web 
all in MLA handbook pages 162-167)


Roles sources commonly play in academic arguments:
1. providing background information
the more they know the less you have to paraphrase

2. support claims
quote credible sources to support your claims

3. Present opposing views
Quoting and paraphrasing opposing views makes your argument stronger and enhances credibility.

4. Improve ethos
Having sources and info from other articles and writers makes you more credible. SHOW YOUR ARGUMENT AS CONTRIBUTING, ADVANCES OR CRITIQUES THAT DISCUSSION.

Summarizing -- (page 402)
The key is to summarize only what you need to to advance your argument.

paraphrasing -- (page 405)
you are capturing ALL the sources ideas: arguments and finding. (Bosshart 54).
Helps you introduce opposing points of view

quoting -- (page 408)
enhance ethos
enliven argument
advance argument
NOT TO TAKE UP SPACE

DON'T FORGET 3/28-3/31 CRITICAL THINKING TEST AND WRITING SKILLS TEST
YOU ALL ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE THE TEST
IT WILL COUNT AS 5 PERCENT OF YOUR COURSE GRADE (I WILL NOT BE GRADING, THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT WILL RETURN TO ME)
YOU WILL RECEIVE TEST REPORTS AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER, THESE REPORTS WILL SHOW HOW YOU PERFORMED COMPARED TO ALL OTHER UNLV 102 STUDENTS, ALL STUDENTS NATIONALLY

Ethos, Pathos, Logos discussion

Ethos

Establishing your credibility is essential when writing academic arguments.

How do academic writers generally establish their authority? (page 337-339)

What are common ethos-related fallacies? (page 342-343) Why do they so often work?

1. Ad hominem attacks

2. Poisoning the well

3. False authority
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0wYxh-akZs

Why do we think of this source as being credible?

4. Dogmatism




Pathos

Properly and ethically employed, emotional appeals can work with logical appeals to enhance the persuasive power of your academic arguments.

How can pathos help you create a bond with your audience? (pages 332-334)

What are the common pathos-related fallacies? (pages 335
-336) Why do they so often work?

1. Bandwagon

2. Slippery slope

3. Scare tactics

4. Appeals to sentiment

5. Appeal to tradition

http://movies.netflix.com/WiPlayer?movieid=70116512&trkid=2361637
2-17



Logos

At the heart of any academic argument is a claim supported by reasons and evidence, an explanation of the link between that claim and its support, and an acknowledgment of the claim's limitations.

What are the parts of creating logos in your argument? (page 326)

What are the common logos-related fallacies? (page 328-329) Why do these often succeed?

1. Hasty generalization

2. False cause

3. Appeal to ignorance

4. Non sequitur

5. Begging the question

6. Straw man

7. False dilemma


http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/mon-august-16-2010/mosque-erade
What fallacies were perpetuated here?


So...how should we write?

Personal/peer review for WP 2

You're half way done with English 102!

Personal review:
Read your
rough draft carefully. What areas do you feel are the strongest and weakest?
How can you improve on the weak areas?
What questions do you have for your peer reviewers?

Peer review: Make sure at least two other people answer these questions for you. Also make sure I see your paper to verify length. (Minimum three pages formatted correctly). THIS SHOULD TAKE THE ENTIRE CLASS PERIOD IF YOU DO IT CORRECTLY.

1. Is there a complete thesis/intro graf? Star the intro sentence (s); underline the thesis (claim); place corresponding numbers on the essay map (1,2,3), then make sure those topic sentences correspond to body paragraphs.

2. Is there a title? Does it work as an intro to the thesis? Is it original, informative and engaging?

3. Does the paper meet the requirements -- is it an argument analysis examining the components and elements of an argument presented in one of our assigned texts?

4. Does the introduction appeal to my reason, emotion, ethics? Does it identify the writer's topic?

5. Does it reach a conclusion (claim/thesis) about the extent to which the argument is effective or ineffective? Hint: this must be found in the thesis.

6. Is it formatted for MLA? Remember 2 points possible just for this!

7. How adequately are criteria/judgments supported by evidence? Do any details need to be clarified? Where might comparisons be helpful?

8. Is there a smooth transition from idea to idea? Where does the writer need help?

9.Does the writer use appropriate vocab? Does he/she have a variety of words, no repetitions?

10. Are the citations (quotations and paraphrases) done correctly? Is there a works cited page? Hint: there must be, remember what happened in WP 1. Remember 2 points possible just for this!

11. Go back to the thesis/intro graf. Does it thesis map the paper's organization?

12. Does the writer clearly present opposing points of view on the subject? How might the writer acknowledge, concede or refute them more effectively?

1017 SMACK DOWN


1-10
5 above = read my comments apply them to the next paper, you'll do better
below 5 = write a thesis; organize a paper, read the text book, listen to me, go to the WCenter.
Turning a doc in to WebCampus -- title it by your last name
"." ,"
toward
forward
backward
afterward

MLA .  DON'T DO THAT ONE SPACE WILL DO
How do I cite a summary?

Becky is very angry. She is so so angry (Bosshart 1017).

Becky Bosshart is angry. She is so angry (1017).

Citing quotes in a text.
page 69-71
"Weaving quotations into your essay"
A. Vogel argues, "We let grades... " (488).
B. "We let grades...," Vogel argues, "Money is..." (448).
C. "We let grades...," Vogel claims (448).
D. "We let....," (Vogel 448).
E. Vogel reminds us: "We let grades..." (448).

Follow directions!

Brook's book 
Brooks' essay
misused words grammar chapter 5

Chapter 7 quiz

You'll turn this in for a grade, so please write on a separate sheet of paper.

1. What is the procedure for analysis?

2.
What is rhetorical analysis? How is it different from a personal response?

3. What is evaluation? How is it different from analysis?

4. What are three ways you could structure your analysis? (show me in quick outlines)

5. What is exploratory analysis? What is the goal?

6. Write one question used in exploratory analysis?

7. What does it mean to analyze and evaluate an image?

8. List one question for analyzing and evaluating an image: